Amazing, regenerating emu oil

February 25, 2012

Beauty and Appearance, Healing, Skin

The oil quickly and deeply penetrates into the skin to diminish fine lines, reduce the appearance of age spots, lessen under-eye puffiness and thicken aging skin up to 10 times.

by Julia Busch — 

The range of reported benefits from a food by-product — the oil obtained from the fat of the six-foot emu (a bird related to the ostrich) — seems miraculous.

The oil quickly and deeply penetrates into the skin to diminish fine lines, reduce the appearance of age spots, lessen under-eye puffiness and thicken aging skin up to 10 times.

Emu oil appears to literally rebuild cells from the inside out. Dr. Leigh Hopkins, consultant pharmacist and clinical professor of pharmacy, says, “It is clear … that healing is occurring.”

Helping with eczema and acneic skin, emu oil is said to regrow hair and control dandruff, hasten healing from cosmetic peels, soothe rashes and roseola, as well as prevent latex dermatitis. It softens calluses, protects skin from chlorine irritation, softens dry cuticles and promotes healthy nail growth. Additionally, a two-year study shows a 50 percent to 100 percent reduction in 20-year-old stretch marks.

A quick resolution to burns, this miracle oil accelerates deep wound healing, is a superlative sexual lubricant, helps with hemorrhoid pain, and a single drop (according to a satisfied user) on your toothbrush daily can eliminate deep pockets between your teeth and firm up swollen and bleeding gums.

“The oil can be operating across a broad range of disease conditions by way of some common action …” suggests Hopkins. The ratio of myristic, palmitic, palmitoleic, stearic, oleic, linoleic and linolenic fats in emu oil may be critical to the normalization of the healing process.

Besides being high in oils essential to good health, emu oil’s anti-inflammatory, nontoxic antibacterial oral dosing seems to help the body speed up the healing of arthritis, while reducing cholesterol and arterial plaque.

Prices vary according to product: rendered oil (cheapest), food grade and pharmaceutical grade, and according to the added ingredients. All in all, emu oil is quite cost-effective, particularly considering its myriad benefits.

 

Julia Busch is president of Anti-Aging Press, Inc., editor of the So Young™ anti-aging holistic newsletter and author of 10 books. For a complete list of emu oil’s benefits, e-mail: juliabusch@att.net.

Reprinted from AzNetNews, Volume 29, Number 5, Oct/Nov 2010.

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