How to make our children smarter

It is estimated that 15 to 20 percent of students in every classroom are not achieving at their grade levels as well as they could.

by Nina Anderson and Frances Meiser — 

It is estimated that 15 to 20 percent of students in every classroom are not achieving at their grade levels as well as they could. Some may have been labeled learning disabled (LD) or as having attention deficit disorder (ADD), attention deficit hyperactive disorder (ADHD), dyslexia or other syndromes. Even a child who has not been diagnosed may experience a difficult time in school. Neurological immaturity is often the cause of these learning difficulties, wherein the messages are not being properly transmitted and received in the brain due to diet, lack of physical exercise or spinal misalignment.

To create a healthy brain, it is necessary to drink lots of filtered water with electrolytes and eat whole grains, meat, nuts and seeds, flax and oils. Midline-crossing exercises (e.g., Brain Gym) are also important for fostering neural development, as is avoiding electromagnetic devices like microwaves and cell phones.

Playing electronic games is encouraged because it fosters brain development for today’s fast-paced lifestyle. However, warnings are issued about their addictive nature and their potential to cause children to forego much-needed physical exercise. Video games also can trigger violent behavior when the user cannot disassociate a virtual scenario from reality.

Brain connections are normally developed during the infant and toddler years, which is why it is so important to start your child on an early pathway to brain health. By taking an active role in the child’s brain development, you may help him or her achieve higher levels of learning with fewer roadblocks.

 

Nina Anderson and Frances Meiser are authors of The Smart Brain Train and Overcoming Senior Moments. www.safegoodspub.com.

Reprinted from AzNetNews, Volume 27, Number 1, February/March 2008.

 

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