Killer computer postures

July 27, 2012

Back pain, Exercise, Headache, Pain

The human body is not designed to sit in a chair at a desk, hour after hour, day after day. It is built for moving.

by Matt Schoeneberger — 

The information age has enabled us to communicate in incredible ways, ushering in a fast-paced society where anything is possible. We can accomplish almost all we need to with a few clicks of a mouse or keyboard. We have become “best friends” with our computers, dependent upon their service and lost when they fail. Could this relationship be the death of us?

The human body is not designed to sit in a chair at a desk, hour after hour, day after day. The human body is built for moving. Unfortunately, we do not move much at all. The information age has also ushered in a new posture, one with rounded shoulders, a forward positioned head, misaligned hips, and the pain and dysfunction that result. Associated symptoms and conditions include, but are not limited to, headaches, neck pain, back pain, bulging or herniated disks, degenerative disk disease, facet syndrome and other more complicated impairments.

A well-designed corrective exercise program can help you avoid or repair postural distortions that could lead to pain and dysfunction. After all, it is the imbalanced muscular system that creates a misaligned skeleton. However, what you can fix in the gym in 30 minutes, you can easily tear down in those remaining 23.5 hours in the day. So be mindful of your posture throughout the day. Maintain proper alignment, avoid repetitive movements while seated (like twisting and reaching into a filing cabinet), and get up and move around as often as possible. Remember that the best posture is one that is always changing.

 

Matt Schoeneberger, B.A., C.P.T., is a personal trainer and co-owner of L.E.A.N. Wellness Center in Mesa, Ariz. He and his staff specialize in helping people feel, function and look their best. 480-200-4206, MattS@getleanstaylean.com or www.getLEANstayLEAN.com.

Reprinted from AzNetNews, Volume 27, Number 2, April/May 2008.

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