Liquid calories ad campaign

“Drinking beverages loaded with sugars increases the risk of obesity and associated problems, particularly diabetes, but also heart disease, stroke, arthritis and cancer.”

The New York City Department of Health is running a novel ad campaign this fall targeting liquid calories. The ads go right for the gross-out effect by depicting soft drinks and other sugary drinks, when absorbed by the body, as turning into revolting frothy chunks of fat.

“Sugary drinks shouldn’t be a part of our everyday diet,” said New York City Health Commissioner Thomas A. Farley. “Drinking beverages loaded with sugars increases the risk of obesity and associated problems, particularly diabetes, but also heart disease, stroke, arthritis and cancer.”

Soft drinks used to come in 6.5-ounce bottles. Today, 12-ounce cans are considered small and 20-ounce bottles typical. Fruit juice is more nutritious than soft drinks, and rarely consumed in such large portions, but it is just as rich in calories. The NYC Health Department advises parents not to serve their kids punch, fruit-flavored drinks, or sports and energy drinks. Most of them are low in nutrients and high in empty calories. The best way to stay hydrated while exercising is to drink water.

“When people count calories, they too often forget to include the liquid ones,” said Cathy Nonas, director of the NYC Health Department’s Physical Activity and Nutrition Programs. “We need to start thinking of the sugar in sweetened drinks as unwanted, wasted calories. These calories provide no nutritional benefits and can lead to weight gain. Water and other zero-calorie beverages are a better choice.”

 

Reference: New York City Department of Health www.nyc.gov/html/doh/html/pr2009/pr057-09.shtml

Reprinted from AzNetNews, Volume 28, Number  5, Oct/Nov 2009.

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