Meditation, not medication

February 24, 2012

Depression, Meditation

Now for some good news: Research suggests that alternative treatments may be as effective as — and definitely safer than — antidepressant medications.

by Dr. Nicholas Warner — 

For decades, antidepressants have been the mainstay treatment for depression, an approach that has garnered significant criticism over the years from those who believe the drugs are widely overprescribed and unsafe. For example, in some cases, antidepressants appear to actually increase the risk of suicidal thoughts and/or behaviors, certainly not a desired consequence for anyone, but particularly undesirable for someone suffering from depression.

Now for some good news: Research suggests that alternative treatments may be as effective as — and definitely safer than — antidepressant medications. A case in point is a study published in the Archives of General Psychiatry that suggests meditation benefits depression patients who are in remission from the disorder.

In the study, patients who learned how to meditate 40 minutes a day instead of taking antidepressant medications were as likely to avoid a relapse as patients taking real antidepressants or a placebo.

Keep in mind that depression, particularly major depressive disorder, goes far beyond “feeling blue.” Depression symptoms can severely impact home, school and work life.

For more information about depression and warning signs, visit the NIMH Web site at www.nimh.nih.gov/health/index.shtml.

 

Dr. Nicholas Warner is a certified massage therapist and a doctor of chiropractic with Wellness in Motion, Inc., in Phoenix. He is an instructor for the Southern California University of Health Sciences and Utah College of Massage Therapy. 602-863-4252 or www.wellness-in-motion.com.

 Reprinted from AZNetNews, Volume 30, Number 3, June/July 2011.

, , , ,
Web Analytics