Redroot: A rescue for lazy lymphatics

July 20, 2012

Health, Herbs, Inflammation, Recipes

Historically, redroot was used to treat strep throat, upper respiratory infections, ulcerations of the skin, snakebites, diarrhea and myriad other problems.

by Kathleen Gould — 

Editor’s Note: This article is for informational purposes only. The information contained herein is not intended to substitute for professional medical care or advice.

 

When the immune system responds to an illness, white blood cells that kill the invading bacteria are moved to the lymph system for disposal from the body. The more quickly the lymph system can clear out this old cellular garbage, the more quickly the body will heal.

Indications that the lymph system is congested and not performing optimally are swollen or inflamed lymph nodes or glands (tonsils, appendix, spleen or liver). Because of this, herbalists pay specific attention to the lymph system and have a great appreciation for its subtlety.

To insure that herbs like Echinacea or Boneset work most effectively, some herbalists almost always add the amazing lymph-stimulating herb redroot (Ceanothus americanus) to formulas.

Redroot is a blood purifier and is used in formulas to treat and, more importantly, help prevent congestion in the lymph, spleen and liver — but it does not stop there. Like all herbs, redroot has many other wonderful uses. It is an expectorant, anti-inflammatory, astringent, mucus membrane tonic and more.

Historically, redroot was used to treat strep throat, upper respiratory infections, ulcerations of the skin, snakebites, diarrhea and myriad other problems.

Here is a simple but surefire remedy to use at the very onset of a cold or flu, or for a case of strep throat:

  •  ounce Echinacea angustofolia or purpurea root
  • 1 ounce redroot
  • 1/2 ounce licorice root

To prepare: Mix herbs in a large pot with 2-1/2 quarts of cold water. Cover tightly and bring to a simmer; simmer gently for 30 minutes. Take 1 tablespoon four to six times per day. For severe throat pain, gargle with tea at least four to six times a day, then swallow. Refrigerate unused tea until ready to use.

You can also make a tincture with the above formula, and take 1/2 teaspoon four times a day.

 

Kathleen Gould is a registered herbalist and a professional member of the American Herbalist Guild. She is the proprietor of SW Herb Co. in Gilbert, Ariz., where she conducts private consultations and teaches herbal healing classes and an herbal certification course. 480-694-9931, kathyswherbco@yahoo.com or www.swherbco.com.

Reprinted from AzNetNews, Volume 27, Number 1, February/March 2008.


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