This infinite living moment

Every moment presents the chance to derail rigid plans, turn your attention to others, lavish love on the beauty around you.

by Barbara K. Richardson — 

Change — even the possibility of change — is often accompanied by uncertainty, fear and anxiety. But when we are able to move beyond our initial resistance, another perspective comes into view: we have change to thank for making life bearable. Actually, more than bearable — wonderful.

So many spiritual traditions point to this, the power of a moment to change us. How does this power manifest in our lives?

People in Portland, Ore., say, “If you don’t like the weather, wait 20 minutes!” Accustomed to gray skies and drizzle for half the year, they make the most of the sunshine when it comes.

Their attitude declares: Yes, it is gloomy, but I am ready and willing to embrace warmth. No city in the U.S. has as many cyclists, walkers and gardeners. When a clearing in the clouds brings a chance to get outside, Portlanders spin, stride and dig. The unexpected gives their days a fluid readiness and helps to even out the low days of rain.

How ready are we to embrace the new? In essence, this is our full-time job. Not to fling ourselves heedlessly into every passing chance, but to accept the challenge each moment brings. The car door slams on our coat. Swear or just reopen the door? A mechanic needs to order another part to fix the door. Fume or take time to walk across the parking lot in the breezy sunshine, eat a snow cone and call a friend?

Every moment ia an opportunity to be your best. Every moment presents the chance to derail rigid plans, turn your attention to others, lavish love on the beauty around you. Elias Amidon, a Sufi teacher, says “Radiance is present in this infinite living moment.” (For more information on Amidon, see www.sufiway.org.)

We have probably all felt that radiance at times, but to call the moment “living” gives a whole new force to honoring, cherishing and feeding the moment as it passes, because it is alive.

The next time you are feeling bored, lost or frightened, spin, stride or dig. Become the living, breathing ever-changing vitality of this moment. And say a word of thanks to change.

 

Barbara K. Richardson is a landscape designer who earned a MFA in creative writing and is the author of Guest House, a novel about the transformative power of love. www.barbarakrichardson.com or 801-661-6177.

Reprinted from AzNetNews, Volume 29, Number 5, Oct/Nov 2010.

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