Tips for feeling and looking great

By being more conscientious about our water intake, the foods we put in our mouths and the products we put on our skin, we will find that over time we will begin to see real results reflected in our outward appearances.

by Linda Leibl — 

Wouldn’t you love to look and feel great every day of your life? Admittedly, it does take some work. But the good news is, if you make a habit out of your beauty and health routines, eventually they cease to seem like such chores.

Just like brushing your teeth every night has become routine, so will cleansing your face and applying moisturizers before you hit the pillow. Remember, this is something you do for yourself. So if you can focus on the outcome, rather than the task at hand, it will seem less like work.

That being said, I share many beauty and health tips with my clients when they come to me for their first appointment, and they repay me with tips from their areas of expertise. We have been sharing information this way for the last 20 years. Many of my clients have been in the health and wellness industries, with professions ranging from a Chinese physician to nurses, dieticians and nutritionists, acupuncturists, and holistic and naturopathic doctors. All are very discerning women who keep up on all the healthiest choices.

First things first: Hydration

Let’s start with your water intake. Water is crucial. It is said you can go without food for five days, but only three days without water. So, look for the purest water you can find. You want to drink about six to eight glasses a day, or one-half your weight in ounces. For example, I am 130 pounds, which means I need to drink 65 ounces, or about eight 8-ounce glasses of water daily. Put the water in a pretty glass, and add a twist of lemon.

A great way to break your fast in the morning is to drink lemon water upon rising. If you are looking to lose a few pounds, you might discover that often when you think you are hungry, you are actually thirsty. Learning to identify this feeling will not only help you drink more water, but it will also help you move into the “now” by becoming more aware of your body’s needs.

A healthy diet

I am not a certified dietician or nutritionist; however, food is a huge part of supplying your skin with the vitamins, minerals, enzymes and nutrients it needs. Two excellent books I frequently reference are Eat Right for Your Blood Type, by James D. Adamo and The pH Miracle, by Robert Young.

Upon applying the principles in these books, many clients find they lose weight and begin to feel better. They also begin to seek more variety in their food selections as they reduce their intake of processed, packaged and man-made selections from traditional grocery stores. Both books contain menus and recipes that may open you up to discovering an abundance of exciting food choices you never knew about. In addition, you might even find solutions for other issues you may encounter while working toward a healthier lifestyle.

The big five

Specifically, in terms of food, my clients really relate when we discuss “the big five.” That’s how I refer to red meat, caffeine, white flour, sugar and chocolate — major components of the SAD, or Standard American Diet.

When we eat too much of the big five, as well as dairy that is pasteurized, bleached and loaded with the residues of antibiotics and growth hormones, toxins build up in the body. One reason such a large portion of our population heads to the gym to lose weight is that we eat too much of these “acidic” foods, which turn into sugar and fat. If we ate healthier, perhaps we would not feel the need to exercise so much.

If you take a hard look at other cultures, many do not even have gyms in their country — and yet their people often live beyond 100 years of age. Many Chinese, for example, eat warm, healthy foods in small amounts and move their bodies in moderation all day long. They do not suffer many of the diseases complicated by the man-made, processed and dead foods we eat.

It may help to think of your body as one unit, and yourself as the keeper of the unit. Of course, you want it to be clean, pretty and working in optimal condition for as long as it can. Think of your body, your health and your skin in this same manner. Like the queen of your castle, you can monitor what goes in and out of your manor physically, mentally, emotionally and spiritually.

So, watch what goes in your mouth and focus on healthy eating. The books mentioned earlier can also help you with this.

Become aware of what you are doing

Keep in mind when using different types of creams and lotions, face, body and hair products, cosmetics, deodorants and the like, that you are piling product after product on and into your body every day, week, month and year. These permeate your skin in 26 seconds or less, meaning you are continually accumulating more products in your body, which really add up over time. Your body can only process so many toxins, and you could contract conditions like fibromyalgia, lupus, and thyroid and hormonal imbalances. These, coupled with unhealthy habits, not only harm your body, but harm your skin over time.

As a result, you may find that, whatever your age, you have been abusing your body unwittingly since you were a teenager. Consider reducing the intake of some of these products and making wiser choices.

By being more conscientious about our water intake, the foods we put in our mouths and the products we put on our skin, we will find that over time we will begin to see real results reflected in our outward appearances. Start by correcting some of the bad habits and learn to form new habits that will become as routine as brushing your teeth. In the long run, these routines will pay off with big returns, and you will look and feel your best every day.

 

Linda Leibl, B.S., Cl.Aest., founded Advanced Skin Technology in Scottsdale, Ariz., in 1993. www.mybeautifulskin.com to view before-and-after photos and Linda’s background. 480-443-3445 or LindaL@myarbonne.com.

Reprinted from AzNetNews, Volume 26, Number 6, December 2007/January 2008.

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