Repetitive stress relief

The overuse of our bodies to carry out these modern-day tasks, primarily with our arms, is expressed as pain and discomfort in the wrists and hands.

by Victoria Bowmann — 

We live in a fast-paced and demanding world. Whether we are making phone calls and handling appointments on the way to work, or text messaging throughout the day and sending e-mail late into the night, many of us seem to always be on the go.

The overuse of our bodies to carry out these modern-day tasks, primarily with our arms, is expressed as pain and discomfort in the wrists and hands. This may be diagnosed as carpal tunnel syndrome. Those who spend a lot of time standing, especially in one stationary position, complain of pain in the calves and feet. Sometimes this is diagnosed as plantar fasciitis. No matter which of these conditions it is, the sufferer can experience sleepless nights and extreme distress.

Various methods can address these problems. I have found two forms of therapeutic bodywork that consistently give successful results.

One is a muscle plucking method developed 50 years ago in Australia. As the muscle is plucked (like a guitar string), a vibration is created deep within the nerves. This vibration begins to unravel the tensions and stress. A pattern of movements, with rest periods between each sequence, addresses the various parts of the body. Relief usually begins with the first treatment; however three or four sessions may be needed to heal without pain.

The other method was developed about a dozen years ago in Colorado. It is a stroking pressure, combined with a stretching technique, that progressively releases the recoil of an overused or damaged muscle. This is like a muscle cramp that can drive you out of bed from the pain.

This method also requires the person to practice specific stretching techniques to maintain the increased flexibility and integrity of the muscle achieved during a treatment. Several sessions may be needed, depending on the severity and longevity of the condition; however, some relief is often achieved with the first treatment.

Although the methods are quite different in technique, each can be highly successful. For those suffering from the painful effects of repetitive movement, there is help. And it is only a muscle pluck or stroke and stretch away.

 

Victoria Bowmann, Ph.D., is a licensed massage practitioner specializing in cleansing and detoxification. She has been in private practice in northeast Phoenix since 1978. 602-971-8392 or vbowmann@cox.net.

Reprinted from AzNetNews, Volume 27, Number 5, October/November 2008.

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